Other People’s Stories

Review: “How Not to Die from Parkinson’s Disease”
Bruce

Review: “How Not to Die from Parkinson’s Disease”

At the World Parkinson Congress last September, I walked in on the tail-end of an academic session that dealt with nutrition.  The speaker ended with a strong pitch that we all read – and follow – Dr. Michael Greger’s book How Not to Die, the first half of which contains a chapter titled “How Not …

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Cure for Parkinson’s? Try Irish Dancing!
Bruce

Cure for Parkinson’s? Try Irish Dancing!

A friend alerted me to this article about an Italian doctor who enjoys playing Irish music and who noticed that a man with Parkinson’s seemed to lose his symptoms when he did Irish dancing. So the doctor, Daniele Volpe, conducted an experiment with 24 Parkies.  Half of them received conventional physical therapy for six months.  The …

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A Great Solution for Gay Senior Citizens
Bruce

A Great Solution for Gay Senior Citizens

I’ve posted a few times about the difficulties LGBTQ Parkies face, especially as they age and are in need of housing (click!  click!  click!).  One problem, as exemplified in the case of Marsha Wetzel, is finding a senior citizen residence where you aren’t harassed by fellow residents who are anti-gay, and where you feel supported by …

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More Potential Dangers for LGBTQ Parkies
Bruce

More Potential Dangers for LGBTQ Parkies

Last week I reviewed a host of issues concerning Parkinson’s disease and the LGBTQ community; it was a follow-up on an earlier post I wrote shortly after the World Parkinson Congress in September. This week there is another news item on the same topic.  The Texas Supreme Court, in a unanimous decision, declared that married same-sex …

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Inequities in Parkinson’s Disease Medical Treatment
Bruce

Inequities in Parkinson’s Disease Medical Treatment

John L. Lehr, the chief executive officer of the Parkinson’s Foundation, recently published an article titled “Working Toward a World Without Parkinson’s Disease.”  The first paragraph ends with these optimistic words: While there is no cure for Parkinson’s and no proven way to slow its progression, there is new reason to hope for a world …

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Gay, with Parkinson’s.  An Update.
Bruce

Gay, with Parkinson’s.  An Update.

After the World Parkinson Congress last September in Portland, I posted a blog titled “Gay, with Parkinson’s.  What are the Issues?”  It basically elaborated on a list of issues that two gay couples attending the Congress and I came up with one night at dinner. Here’s an update on things I think LGBTQ Parkies must …

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Living With Another Scary Neurological Disease – ALS
Bruce

Living With Another Scary Neurological Disease – ALS

Last week I posted a New York Times article where five people with Parkinson’s disease told their stories through text, audio and photographs. This week the Times is running a similar article about people living with ALS (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, also known as Lou Gehrig’s disease).  Through pictures, audio and text, we learn about five …

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Individual Parkies Taking Charge
Bruce

Individual Parkies Taking Charge

There’s been a bunch of articles recently about average Jane or Joe Parkies taking charge of their lives and speaking out.  Shall we review a few? 1. Mike Wood Lifts Weights Mike Wood, who lives in La Grande, Oregon, learned he had Parkinson’s three years ago, when he was 58.  At first he was devastated …

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“Time” for Parkinson’s
Bruce

“Time” for Parkinson’s

The online Time magazine has a great article on Margaret Bourke-White, the famous Life magazine photographer who developed Parkinson’s disease in 1953 and fought it tooth and nail so she could continue taking pictures.  But the 1950s were not a good time to come down with Parkinson’s; she didn’t have the drugs we take today (including …

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Writing in Kindergarten
Bruce

Writing in Kindergarten

This week I was in a kindergarten class at my school, sitting next to a girl who was writing in her journal.  Her teacher’s instructions were to write anything she wanted to write, using words she knew from having studied them throughout the year. The girl wrote the following possibly sad? revealing? story.  She needed …

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